More Commits via the GitHub API

I wrote a bit ago about making commits via the GitHub API. That post outlined making changes in two simplified situations: making changes to a single file and making updates to two existing files at the root of the repository. Here I show a more general solution that allows arbitrary changes anywhere in the repo.

I want to be able to specify a repo and branch and say "here are the contents of files that have changed or been created and here are the names of files that have been deleted, please take all that and this message and make a new commit for me." Because the GitHub API is so rudimentary when it comes to making commits that will end up being a many-stepped process, but it’s mostly the same steps repeated many times so it’s not a nightmare to code up. At a high level the process goes like this:

  • Get the current repo state from GitHub
    • This is the names and hashes of all the files and directories, but not the actual file contents.
  • Construct a local, malleable representation of the repo
  • Modify the local representation according to the given updates, creations, and deletions
  • Walk though the modified local "repo" and upload new/changed files and directories to GitHub
    • This must be done from the bottom up because a change at the low level means every directory above that level will need to be changed.
  • Make a new commit pointed at the new root tree (I’ll explain trees soon.)
  • Update the working branch to point to the new commit

This blob post is readable as an IPython Notebook at http://nbviewer.ipython.org/gist/jiffyclub/10809459. I’ve also reproduced the notebook below. Read More »

Making Commits via the GitHub API

For fun I’ve been learning a bit about the GitHub API. Using the API it’s possible to do just about everything you can do on GitHub itself, from commenting on PRs to adding commits to a repo. Here I’m going to show how to do add commits to a repo on GitHub. A notebook demonstrating things with code is available here, but you may want to read this post first for the high level view.

Choosing a Client Library

The GitHub API is an HTTP interface so you can talk to it via any tool that speaks HTTP, including things like curl. To make programming with the API simpler there are a number of libraries that allow communicate with GitHub via means native to whatever language you’re using. I’m using Python and I went with the github3.py library based on its Python 3 compatibility, active development, and good documentation.

Making Commits

The repository api is the gateway for doing anything to a repo. In github3.py this is corresponds to the repository module.

Modifying a Single File

The special case of making a commit affecting a single file is much simpler than affecting multiple files. Creating, updating, and deleting a file can be done via a single API call once you have enough information to specify what you want done.

Modifying Multiple Files

Making a commit affecting multiple files requires making multiple API calls and some understanding of Git’s internal data store. That’s because to change multiple files you have to add all the changes to the repo one at a time before making a commit. The process is outlined in full in the API docs about Git data.

I should note that I think deleting multiple files in a single commit requires a slightly different procedure, one I’ll cover in another post.


That’s the overview, look over the notebook for the code! http://nbviewer.ipython.org/gist/jiffyclub/9235955