State of Conda, Oct. 2014

I have been using Conda (via Miniconda) for managing my Python development environments and packages for close to a year now, so I thought I’d write up my thoughts so far for others.

Conda is both an environment manager (an alternative to virtualenv) and an installation tool (an alternative to pip). You can also use Conda to build your packages and distribute them via Binstar.

So, what does Conda do well and what needs improvement? Continue reading “State of Conda, Oct. 2014”

State of Conda, Oct. 2014

Using Conda Environments and the Fish Shell

I recently started over with a fresh development environment and decided to try something new: I’m using Python 3 via miniconda. The first real hiccup I’ve run into is that conda’s environment activation/deactivation scheme only works in bash or zsh. I use fish. There is an open PR to get fish support for conda but in the meantime I hacked something together to help me out.

"Activating" a conda environment does a couple of things:

  • Puts the environment’s "bin" directory at the front of the PATH environment variable.
  • Sets a CONDA_DEFAULT_ENV environment variable that tells conda in which environment to do things when none is specified.
  • Adds the environment name to the prompt ala virtualenv.

Deactivating the environment resets everything to its pre-activation state. The fish functions I put together work like this:

~ > type python
python is /Users/---/miniconda3/bin/python
~ > condactivate env-name
(env-name) ~ > type python
python is /Users/---/miniconda3/envs/env-name/bin/python
(env-name) ~ > deactivate
~ > type python
python is /Users/---/miniconda3/bin/python

Here’s the text of the functions:


Or you can download it from https://gist.github.com/jiffyclub/9679788.

To use these, add them to the ~/.config/fish/ directory and source them from the end of the ~/.config/fish/config.fish file:

source $HOME/.config/fish/conda.fish
Using Conda Environments and the Fish Shell